SOURCE WATER CONTAMINATION

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WATER INDUSTRY FEATURES, INSIGHTS, & ANALYSIS

  • Water Acquisition Challenges For Industrial Plants
    Water Acquisition Challenges For Industrial Plants

    Water is becoming more complex for industry. Its cost as a component of production is on the rise, and greater regulatory scrutiny continues to expand post-process wastewater treatment. Against a backdrop of growing water scarcity, industrial leaders are focusing more time and energy into leveraging water acquisition and usage to their competitive advantage. The days when access to water was taken for granted are over. In fact, by 2030 global water demand is projected to exceed available water by 40 percent.

  • Peaking Factors And Hydraulics In Wastewater Screen Sizing

    Dealing with fine particulate matter, nutrients, and pathogens is essential for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) striving to meet Clean Water Act (CWA) effluent standards. Before that stage, however, come important considerations about removing larger debris that can clog pumps, overload clarifiers, or disrupt other downstream processes — especially during periods of elevated flow and debris loading.

  • WWTP Air Handling Control Philosophies: Do’s And Don’ts

    Without an appropriate control strategy, even the best wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) equipment can struggle to deliver maximum efficiency. Because energy costs represent up to 60 percent of WWTP plant operating expense, air distribution designs and changing loading (biochemical/biological oxygen demand [BOD]/chemical oxygen demand [COD], ammonia) demands require control strategies designed to adapt to all eventualities efficiently. The following checklists, plus important Do’s and Don’ts, can help in identifying an underperforming control strategy and developing a better one.

  • Ease Of Installation And Maintenance Fuels Innovation At AMERICAN
    Ease Of Installation And Maintenance Fuels Innovation At AMERICAN

    At AWWA’s ACE 2018 event, Maury Gaston, Manager of Marketing Services for AMERICAN’s Ductile Iron and AMERICAN SpiralWeld Pipe product lines, presented on reducing energy through pipe selection, evaluating the City of Huntsville and its 1,297-mile long network. Gaston presented his findings and explained the energy savings in terms of dollars but also kilowatt hours, carbon equivalents and bond values.

  • Turning Down The Power On High Recovery Desalination — A Global Need
    Turning Down The Power On High Recovery Desalination — A Global Need

    Envision a world absent of a water crisis, an end to the threatened health and economic welfare affecting nearly 1.5 billion people due to water scarcity. Clean, safe, fresh water is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity in the 21st century and we are only scraping the surface on achieving public awareness. As our global population increases, access to clean water decreases; a metric with diminishing returns.

  • Maximizing The ROI On Your SCADA Investment
    Maximizing The ROI On Your SCADA Investment

    In many water industry applications, a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system is considered the heartbeat of the operation. As a result, many data management decisions revolve around what the SCADA system can or cannot do and how big of a deal and expense it is to change. Can’t there be a way to devise more ROI-responsive data solutions, without having to change SCADA solutions?

  • Beyond The Buzzword: How Utility Operators Can Use Big Data For Better Asset Management, Operations, And Customer Engagement
    Beyond The Buzzword: How Utility Operators Can Use Big Data For Better Asset Management, Operations, And Customer Engagement

    Big Data is more than a marketing buzzword. It’s become an essential tool for helping utility operators prioritize capital investments, manage network assets, and provide a higher level of service to customers.

  • Knowledge Retention: Stay Up To Date As Workers Come And Go
    Knowledge Retention: Stay Up To Date As Workers Come And Go

    Understaffing, upcoming retirements, and finding qualified replacements seem to be recurring themes in the water industry. Perhaps the answers are as much about the tools we use as the people using them. Here is how a new approach to utility data management can capture the knowledge of retiring workers, share the insight across all disciplines, and shore up the skills and interests of the next generation.

  • Smart Hydrants: A Proactive Approach To Main Breaks

    Fewer things are more aggravating to commuters than being told they’ll need to take a detour because of a water main break. Those breaks also leave water utilities with a hefty, unplanned bill. Smart fire hydrants, however, offer water managers the ability to get ahead of these problems by providing more insight than ever into their distribution systems.

  • The Data Influx: Transforming Data Overload Into Business Insights
    The Data Influx: Transforming Data Overload Into Business Insights

    “We have too much data” is the refrain we continually hear from water utilities. It’s no surprise that managing data from multiple sources and turning it into business insights presents a daunting challenge; however, data influx does not have to be a burden. When managed well, there’s no such thing as too much data, especially if your business is implementing a big data strategy — a topic that has implications and reach beyond the scope of this paper.

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SOURCE WATER CONTAMINATION PRODUCTS

UV Technologies UV Technologies

Almost 30 years ago, Calgon Carbon introduced one of the first advanced ultraviolet (UV) oxidation processes to remediate contaminated groundwater. Then soon after, Calgon Carbon became the first company to adapt the technology to cost-effectively inactivate pathogens in surface water. These breakthroughs have established Calgon Carbon as a world leader in the use of UV technology for disinfection and oxidation to treat drinking water, wastewater, groundwater, process water and ballast water.

ReFleX™ Efficiency ReFleX™ Efficiency

For both disinfection and TOC-reduction applications, NeoTech Aqua Solutions’ patented ReFleX™ UV chamber technology represents the state-of-the-art in high-efficiency UV systems by reflecting over 99% of the UV we generate back into the water.

Disinfection Series Disinfection Series

The NeoTech Aqua Disinfection Series is specially designed to disinfect water and is an essential component in advanced oxidation processes.

Patriot™ Series Patriot™ Series

NeoTech Aqua Solutions’ Patriot Series utilizes D438 chamber technology in a stacked and manifolded configuration to support larger flow volumes. By integrating NeoTech Aqua’s patented ReFleX chamber technology, Patriot systems provide the most efficient and versatile UV water treatment equipment available for large volume users. Further, when configured as an n+1 design, the NeoTech Aqua’s Patriot systems meet most redundancy requirements.

TOC Reduction TOC Reduction

NeoTech Aqua Solutions provides the most efficient and cost-effective UV systems for destroying Total Organic Carbons (TOC’s) in water.  Whether your destroying NDMA, 1,4-dioxane, TCE, MTBE, urea, endocrine disruptors or other organics, only NeoTech Aqua provides ultraviolet TOC reduction with a treatment chamber optimized for low pressure mercury lamps.  As a result, NeoTech Aqua’s UV systems achieve a three times greater TOC reduction per kilowatt compared to standard UV systems, reducing our clients’ costs and energy consumption. In addition to efficiently generating ample 185 nm UV for TOC reduction, NeoTech Aqua’s TOC reduction systems also generate significant levels of 254 nm UV which serve as a powerful disinfectant, providing you both TOC-free and organism-free product water.

NeoTech CU-4 X™ NeoTech CU-4 X™

The NeoTech CU4-X™ UV Water Treatment Control Interface is a remote and compact master controller capable of managing up to four NeoTech ultraviolet water treatment chambers independently and simultaneously.

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VIEWS ON THE LATEST REGULATIONS

  • EPA Outlines Possible Solutions To Looming Perchlorate Limits
    EPA Outlines Possible Solutions To Looming Perchlorate Limits

    The U.S. EPA is gearing up to limit perchlorate in public drinking water systems, so municipalities should start preparing to adopt the appropriate testing and treatment technologies. In a recent report, the agency identified several technologies as the best available to address the perchlorate problem.

  • My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS
    My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS

    When I attended the U.S. EPA-hosted PFAS Summit held at the Horsham, PA high school auditorium on July 25, 2018, the education I received from state and municipal leaders focusing on the local problem was more than just a professional briefing. It was ominously personal, due to the fact that the Water Online editorial office where I work and drink water every day is served by a utility sitting smack-dab in the middle of one of the most concentrated PFAS hotspots in the U.S.

  • The ABCs Of PFCs
    The ABCs Of PFCs

    Nick Burns, director of water treatment technology for (the Americas region of) Black & Veatch, discusses the health concerns, current regulatory status, and documented presence of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), also sometimes called perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), in drinking water supplies — as determined by sampling under the U.S. EPA's Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 (UCMR3).

  • What Did Rural America Do To Deserve This?

    By now, just about everyone in the U.S. has heard about Flint, Michigan’s water woes. Despite the many issues raised by that incident, urban water systems are not the sole reason the 2017 Report Card from the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the U.S. drinking water infrastructure an overall “D” grade. Hidden within that disheartening rating are the harsh realities faced by rural water systems.

  • Guiding Water And Wastewater Treatment Under The New EPA

    It’s no secret that the U.S. EPA has changed course in the last year. But how have those changes affected local water and wastewater treatment operations? And how are those operations going to evolve along with the federal agency?

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WATER INDUSTRY FEATURES

  • Gulf Of Mexico’s Hypoxic Zone Larger Than Ever
    Gulf Of Mexico’s Hypoxic Zone Larger Than Ever

    Last year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recorded the largest hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico since monitoring began 32 years ago. Hypoxic waters, often referred to as dead zones, have dissolved oxygen concentrations of less than 2-3 ppm. They are caused by eutrophication or excess nutrients that promote algal growth in water bodies. As algae decompose, they consume oxygen creating dead zones.

  • Patient Centric Monitoring: Preventing And Learning From Mistakes
    Patient Centric Monitoring: Preventing And Learning From Mistakes

    When validating the 1,000,000 data points that compose the typical Phase III trial, focusing on errors that don’t matter easily leads to wasted resources. Human Factor Analysis (HFA) uses uniquely structured datasets to reveal underlying behaviors and factors that are otherwise difficult for humans to sense or reconstruct, but ultimately are the root cause of an incident. Read how HFA can be incorporated into risk-based monitoring as a useful approach for protecting your clinical data.

  • How To Turn Data Into A Difference-Maker
    How To Turn Data Into A Difference-Maker

    With the proliferation of sensors, data collection, and cloud storage, there is the potential for operational insight heretofore never available, and the opportunity will only expand as the technology evolves and the Internet of Things becomes, well, more of a thing. But data is only truly useful if it informs decision-making that results in positive impact — for an organization's bottom line, its personnel, its customers, or even the world at large (i.e., the environment).

  • Wastewater Treatment In Oil Refineries
    Wastewater Treatment In Oil Refineries

    Refineries are among the major consumers of water that has both process and non-process origins. The average refinery requires 2.5 gallons of water for every gallon of crude oil processed. Depending on the type of crude oil, composition of condensate and treatment processes, the characteristics of refinery wastewater varies widely. The design and operation of modern refinery wastewater treatment plants are challenging and are driven by technology. This article will highlight the most common types of waste streams in a refinery and suitable wastewater treatment strategies.

  • Manipulating Dissolved Gasses With SEPAREL®: Oil & Gas
    Manipulating Dissolved Gasses With SEPAREL®: Oil & Gas

    Degassing applications in the oil industry are numerous; steam is used in nearly all processes for refining oil. Therefore, water must be treated to prevent scale and pipe pitting through the removal of dissolved ions and dissolved gasses such as oxygen and CO2. Boiler feed water for producing steam must also be free of dissolved CO2 and oxygen; SEPAREL® degassing membranes can remove both gasses in a single compact system.

  • 7 Tools For Breakthrough Quality And Performance In 30 Days
    7 Tools For Breakthrough Quality And Performance In 30 Days

    In this sixth installment on the selection and use of quality improvement tools in your organization, Ben Locwin wraps up the series with a treatise on the 7 Tools of Quality.

  • Sensitive And Reproducible SPR-Based Concentration And Ligand-Binding Analyses
    Sensitive And Reproducible SPR-Based Concentration And Ligand-Binding Analyses

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assays are used across the life cycle of a biopharmaceutical, from target identification, through CQA determination, development, and on-going quality control. This article focuses on concentration assays associated with late-stage development and biotherapeutic drug chemical manufacturing and control.

  • How To Develop The Best Construction Dewatering Solutions

    Basic construction activities today are more complex than ever when it comes to environmental concerns. Dewatering is a common necessity for contractors and developers today. In addition to ensuring a safe construction site, contractors must be aware of groundwater disposal constraints and regulations.

  • Temperature Monitoring Provides Additional Checks On Microbiological Conditions
    Temperature Monitoring Provides Additional Checks On Microbiological Conditions

    Effective control of the microbiological environment in water distribution systems is one of the biggest keys to providing a healthy product. When it comes to processes for achieving this, the U.S. can some take lessons from Europe, where utilities are more likely to monitor temperature. Advanced flow metering technology that incorporates temperature monitoring provides a significant tool for utilities without the need for additional instruments.

  • Oxidation And AOP: The Last Lines Of Defense Against Harmful Algal Blooms

    Secondary metabolites of algae — including algal toxins and taste and odor compounds triggered by a harmful algal bloom — can find their way into source water, creating the risk that they will ultimately reach the water treatment plant to cause water-quality problems. Here is a checklist of considerations for mitigating those effects through cost-effective oxidation, or combined oxidization processes, across a variety of source water conditions.

  • Defending Against Saltwater Intrusion
    Defending Against Saltwater Intrusion

    Are “ghost forests” a sign of things to come? Rising sea levels and superstorm tidal surges are already impacting coastal areas, with rising salinity levels affecting some drinking water sources. Coastal water utilities are not the only ones that have to worry about salinity, however, as high concentrations of winter storm road treatments, gas drilling, and mining can also generate elevated salinity levels in surface water sources.

  • Treating Emerging Contaminants With UV Advanced Oxidation
    Treating Emerging Contaminants With UV Advanced Oxidation

    As technology improves, contaminants can be measured in ever-smaller quantities. Pollutants formerly undetected are now becoming emerging contaminants of concern. Water utility managers must stay abreast of potential new regulations and plan for ways to address these contaminants.

  • The Financial Upside Of Electronic Meters
    The Financial Upside Of Electronic Meters

    Mechanical flow meters have a proven track record. However, there’s a downside. Electronic meters — which are gaining wider acceptance — are less prone to damage, require little to no maintenance, and can be comparably priced or even less expensive when operating costs are taken into account.

  • Six Top Factors To Consider When Selecting A Flow Meter

    Water utilities rely on accurate and dependable flow measurement for critical process controls. Regulatory agencies also require flow monitoring and reporting, with specific accuracy limits.

  • Understanding The Mid Wave Gas Detection Camera
    Understanding The Mid Wave Gas Detection Camera

    The gas detection camera technique has a wide range of potential uses in the petrochemical industry, all of which have positive benefits for the owner of the plant. It is an accepted Alternate Work Practice in the Method 21 leak detection procedure and has clear time and cost benefits over the conventional VOC meter or sniffer method. Although limited to a certain extent by environmental conditions, the camera has proven many times that it can identify leaks at some distance thereby reducing the cost of surveys by removing the requirement to provide access to every potential leak path.

  • How To Select The Right Carbon For Industrial Wastewater Systems
    How To Select The Right Carbon For Industrial Wastewater Systems

    Most industries are required to remove contaminants from wastewater systems before discharge to a receiving stream or municipal facility. Depending on the industry, contaminants may be numerous or difficult to treat. Finding the most effective, cost-efficient treatment method is critical for both business and the environment.

  • SPRWS Upgrades To Corrosion-Resistant Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Water Main
    SPRWS Upgrades To Corrosion-Resistant Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Water Main

    It is no secret that a large portion of the drinking water infrastructure in the United States is near or past its intended design life. Our nation’s water infrastructure needs an overhaul, and the cost of doing so is climbing rapidly. The American Society of Civil Engineering’s 2017 Infrastructure Report Card graded the nation’s drinking water infrastructure a D. According to the American Water Works Association, an estimated $1 trillion is necessary to maintain and expand drinking water service to meet demands over the next 25 years.

  • X-Ray Inspection Provides Product Safety For Ice Cream Production Lines
    X-Ray Inspection Provides Product Safety For Ice Cream Production Lines

    With a high volume of products being produced and dispatched to retailers across the region, Miko has always known that product safety is hugely important, both for its consumers and for the company’s reputation. Seeking to further reinforce positive customer experiences, the company recently set itself the challenge of minimizing the already small risk of foreign body contamination to further reduce the number of customer complaints it received. Mettler-Toledo Safeline X-ray’s InspireX2, designed for high-speed multi-lane applications and able to detect contaminants as small as 0.8mm, such as glass, metal, mineral stone and high density plastic was the solution they were looking for.

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