DRINKING WATER

Are Your Pumps Running As Efficiently As Practical?
Are Your Pumps Running As Efficiently As Practical?

In water and wastewater operations, optimizing energy use plays a huge role in cost efficiency, but how can you know if pumping equipment and other motors are running as efficiently as possible? Analytics systems that interpret performance from a variety of data points — pump curves, run time, flow rates, vibration, temperature, energy consumption, etc. — can quantify pump operation to keep performance efficiency on an upward track.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • Continuous Analyzer Integrated Data Validation
    Continuous Analyzer Integrated Data Validation

    Continuous analyzers are an integral part of the process to maintain quality, ensure compliance, and protect public health. Therefore it is imperative to ensure the analyzers are functioning properly and provide accurate and reliable data. This requires validation of the data provided by the analyzer on a routine basis. In addition some continuous analyzers incorporate internal data validation capabilities to inform the end user the reliability of the data provided by the analyzer. This paper discusses integrated data validation and how they may be integrated into SCADA systems.

  • Direct Filtration Of Spring Water

    The Franklin Water Treatment Plant, near the Utah/Idaho state border, serves approximately 600 residents. Traditionally, water was drawn from springs and chlorinated.

  • Wastewater Reuse And Recycling Today
    Wastewater Reuse And Recycling Today

    Over the last several years the wastewater reuse segment of the water industry has experienced both rapid growth and tremendous change. Global demand for increased water supplies fuels the development of alternative water sources, including reclaimed wastewater.

  • Granular Activated Carbon Removes PFOA From Drinking Water
    Granular Activated Carbon Removes PFOA From Drinking Water

    In the fall of 2015, a small village on the border of Vermont in New York State, tested positive for Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs), specifically Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA), in the municipal drinking water. The influent levels of PFOA in the water were above 600 ng/L, and thus considered harmful to village residents. Realizing that PFOA was on the U.S. EPA Contaminant Candidate List, the Village solicited the services of engineering firm CT Male Associates to investigate treatment options and provide a treatment system.

  • Smart Water: Remote Sensing
    Smart Water: Remote Sensing

    Automated metering systems (AMSs) or “smart meters” can provide valuable data for electric and water utilities. Data analytics can be used to improve customer service, boost conservation, monitor the system, and even forecast demand. An ultimate goal might be to eventually monitor everything from streetlight intensity to fire hydrants.

  • LADWP Achieves Demand Management Goals With Unique Volumetric Rate Structure, Long-Term Planning
    LADWP Achieves Demand Management Goals With Unique Volumetric Rate Structure, Long-Term Planning

    The Department of Water and Power (DWP) serves the City of Los Angeles and some small adjacent areas and is the one of the largest municipal utilities in the nation.

  • Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor Technology Validated For Title 22 Compliance
    Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor Technology Validated For Title 22 Compliance

    Title 22 of California’s Water Recycling Criteria is among the strictest water treatment standards for water recycling and reuse in the United States. Fluence’s MABR demonstration plant was installed at the Codiga Resource Recovery Center (CR2C) in Stanford, California, in January 2018 for the purpose of third-party evaluation. The testing parameters included criteria to evaluate reliable enhanced nutrient removal in the form of Total Nitrogen, which is increasingly important across the United States and difficult and costly to achieve through conventional wastewater treatment.

  • Township Water Authority Uses Ultrasonic Clamp-On Flow Meters To Avoid Surcharges For Exceeding Peak Limits
    Township Water Authority Uses Ultrasonic Clamp-On Flow Meters To Avoid Surcharges For Exceeding Peak Limits

    A suburban township in the upper Midwest U.S. buys their drinking water from a major municipal water district. The municipality has many customers and has implemented contracts with each of its wholesale customers that limit the peak flows and the time of day in which they may occur. If the wholesale customer exceeds the limit, they are assessed significant surcharges.

  • Project Profile: Meadow Lake MHC White Lake, MI 750 GPM Iron & Manganese System
    Project Profile: Meadow Lake MHC White Lake, MI 750 GPM Iron & Manganese System

    In February 2008 AdEdge Technologies, Inc. was selected as the sole vendor by Sun Communities, a nation wide owner and operator of Mobile Home Communities, to supply an iron and manganese treatment system, for the Meadow Lake MHC in White Lake, Michigan. By Adedge Technologies Inc.

  • 3 Features Critical To An Optimal Utility Communication Network
    3 Features Critical To An Optimal Utility Communication Network

    Choosing the right communication network is crucial to building a successful, smart utility. The quality of the communication technology selected determines whether the data will be transmitted efficiently, securely, and reliably over the long haul. It’s not a decision to be taken lightly.

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Air / Gas Mass Flow Meter Improves Wastewater Treatment Processing Efficiency

    One of the most common processes in wastewater treatment is the activated sludge method, which biologically treats the wastewater through the use of large aeration basins. This process requires the pumping of compressed air into the aeration basins where a diffuser system ensures the air is distributed evenly for optimum treatment. The energy needed to provide compressed air is a significant cost in the operation of a wastewater treatment plant.

  • Determination Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Seafood

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of organic compounds found naturally in the environment. PAHs are monitored by the US Environmental Protection Agency due to their carcinogenic characteristics.

  • Harmonics Reduction Methods

    There are several basic methods for reducing harmonic voltage and current distortion from nonlinear distribution loads such as adjustable frequency drives (AFDs). Following is a description of each method, along with each method’s advantages and disadvantages.

  • Application Note: YSI Water Quality Monitoring Buoys Help Connecticut DOT Protect The Housatonic River When replacement of the Sikorski Bridge spanning the Housatonic River was authorized, Paul Corrente and the Connecticut Department of Transportation (CT-DOT) set about the design and development of a water quality monitoring program to monitor the contractor’s in-water activities to insure full protection of the river from perturbation
  • Analysis Of Pesticide Residue In Spinach Using The AutoMate-Q40 An Automated QuEChERS Solution

    QuEChERS is a Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe extraction method that has been developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities.

  • Immediate pH Correction For Fluctuating Flow

    In a number of water, wastewater and industrial process applications, pH is one of the most critical and highly sensitive analytical measurements.  Examples of critical pH applications include: Reverse Osmosis (RO) systems in which a controlled feed of caustic solution is typically added to the feed stream in order to convert a portion of dissolved carbon dioxide into bicarbonate precipitate allowing for removal by the RO membrane. By Rafik H. Bishara, Steve Jacobs, and Dan Bell

  • All WirelessHART Devices Are Not Created Equal

    Though they all must support routing functionality, some devices do it better than others.

    Routing consumes more energy, so the lifetime of the battery will be affected.  Therefore, a device with a battery that is inexpensive, has a long lifetime, and is easy to change would be ideal. With all this considered, a WirelessHART temperature transmitter is a suitable option to operate as a repeater.

  • Advances In Paper-Based Devices For Water Quality Analysis

    Water quality test strips have been around for decades. They are usually constructed from a porous media, including different types of paper, and undergo a color change when dipped into water containing the analyte of interest. These test strips have seen application in swimming pools, aquariums, hot tubs, remediation sites, and other commercial/environmental areas.

  • Real-Time Conductivity Monitoring Estimates Chloride Levels In Minnesota Watershed By Using The Aqua TROLL 200 Monitoring deicing chemical levels can help researchers, city governments, and regulatory agencies understand runoff impacts on surface water, groundwater, and surrounding environments.
  • Accurate Flowmetering For Enhanced Water Network Performance

    Being able to accurately measure both the quantity and rate of water passing through a water distribution system is crucial to gaining an informed understanding of overall efficiency. As such, achieving a measurement that is exact as possible can have a significant impact on key areas including supply planning, maintenance and resource deployment, leakage detection and rectification and the overall environment, in terms of controlling abstraction and reducing unnecessary draw on natural resources.

More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

4630 Chlorine Analyzer System 4630 Chlorine Analyzer System

The Signet 4630 Chlorine Analyzer System is an integrated all-in-one system designed to measure free chlorine.

Signet 2774-2777 DryLoc® pH/ORP Electrodes Signet 2774-2777 DryLoc® pH/ORP Electrodes

The Signet 2774 - 2777 pH and ORP Electrodes feature a unique foulproof DryLoc® connector with goldplated contacts designed specifically for use with the Signet 2750 and 2760 preamplifiers, sensor electronics, and connectors.

Transmitters With Radar Sensing Technology Improve Level Measurement Accuracy Transmitters With Radar Sensing Technology Improve Level Measurement Accuracy

GF Piping Systems (GF) has expanded its automation product line with two new Level Transmitters. These transmitters incorporate advanced radar sensing technology designed for high accuracy tank level measurement in a wide range of chemical processing and water treatment applications. The addition of radar technology to the company’s existing ultrasonic and hydrostatic sensors now provides three different level measurement technologies to meet virtually any level requirement.

Check Valves Check Valves

Henry Pratt offers a wide variety of check valves in a wide variety of applications. Available in a wide range of sizes and costs for the potable water, wastewater, power, industrial, and nuclear markets.

Unreinforced PPS For Fitting Applications Unreinforced PPS For Fitting Applications

Following the successful introduction of glass fiber-reinforced DIC.PPS Z-230 Black and impact modified GF30 for drinking water applications, the unreinforced and impact modified DIC.PPS Z-200-XY series has been commercially launched for fitting applications. As required by European water regulations, ISO 9080 testing of DIC.PPS Z-200-E5 Gray has been performed at an officially accredited laboratory. This grade exhibits impressive values for maximum hoop stress at various temperatures and is an ideal candidate for the replacement of metals and more costly plastic materials such as PPSU and PVDF utilized for fitting applications.

UVC Sensors UVC Sensors

Sensors work together with ballasts and lamps in a control loop.

More Products

LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

  • Growing And Flourishing In A Desert
    Growing And Flourishing In A Desert

    Water is essential to life. And it is a very precious commodity in Israel, home to 9 million people living in a rocky desert that receives about 10 inches of rain a year. By comparison, Denver, considered semi-arid, gets about 15 inches of rain a year, which is about a fourth of the precipitation a tropical city such as Miami receives.

  • From Emerging To Emerged: What These 'Here Now' Contaminants Mean For The Water Sector
    From Emerging To Emerged: What These 'Here Now' Contaminants Mean For The Water Sector

    As PFAS and a host of other pollutants threaten water systems and erode public confidence, the water industry fights back with a comprehensive action plan.

  • A Fateful Decision: SCOTUS On The Scope Of Clean Water Act Jurisdiction
    A Fateful Decision: SCOTUS On The Scope Of Clean Water Act Jurisdiction

    The question of liability and oversight pertaining to the pollution of “navigable waters” via groundwater flow is on the docket for the Supreme Court — and on the minds of wastewater treatment operators.

  • Protecting Water Quality Has Positive Trickle-Down Effect
    Protecting Water Quality Has Positive Trickle-Down Effect

    They say we all live downstream from someone and upstream from someone else — a reminder, quite literal for the water industry, of our interconnectedness and responsibility to others. In New York, the Army Corps of Engineers proved how relatively small infrastructure improvements can have outsized impact.

  • Impact Of Climate Change On Water Resources
    Impact Of Climate Change On Water Resources

    While climate change repercussions are predicted to be varied and ubiquitous, it is the fate of water that deserves highest consideration, as the prosperity of communities —and countries — hangs in the balance.

  • Scientists Identify Opportunities To Better Understand Oilfield Wastewater
    Scientists Identify Opportunities To Better Understand Oilfield Wastewater

    Collaborative research is a critical element for identifying unforeseen risks associated with using the oil industry’s wastewater outside the oilfield. That’s the recommendation of a new peer-reviewed paper accepted this week in the Journal of Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management (IEAM).

More Drinking Water Features

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Robots Might Help Prevent Toxic Mine Spills

Scientists are developing robots that might someday be able to creep through the pitch-black mines to help prevent spills. A 2015 spill from Colorado’s Gold King Mine unleashed 3 million gallons of water that fouled rivers in three states with toxins.

NMSU Researchers Address Water Management Challenges

In the water-scarce desert Southwest, the agricultural, urban and environmental sectors are constantly competing for limited water. So how do you handle the fact that each stakeholder within those sectors wants something different in a water management strategy, for now and for the future?

Resource Revolution: The Energy/Water Nexus In Unconventional Oil & Gas - Highlights

GE partnered with the Wharton School's Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (IGEL) for an industry leaders' discussion about the energy/water nexus in unconventional oil & gas production.

Freshwater Salinization Syndrome: An Introduction

Across North America, streams and rivers are becoming saltier, thanks to road deicers, fertilizers and other salty compounds that humans indirectly release into waterways. At the same time, freshwater supplies are becoming more alkaline.

Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water

The Western Governors' Drought Forum webinar “Once Marginal, Now Crucial: The Growing Demand for Re-used, Produced, and Brackish Water” explores the technological and regulatory obstacles to utilizing re-used, produced, and brackish water.

More Drinking Water Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.