DRINKING WATER

Linking Technologies Key To A Successful Potable Reuse Project
Linking Technologies Key To A Successful Potable Reuse Project

Potable reuse offers a massive opportunity to recover water from the wastewater process, but projects face a variety of barriers to getting off the ground. Most successful early adopters engaged early with their constituents and implemented smaller-scale demonstration projects that were accessible to the public to prove the technology and process.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • The Top 4 Oxidation Methods For Iron & Manganese
    The Top 4 Oxidation Methods For Iron & Manganese

    Iron is one of the earth's most plentiful resources, making up at least five percent of the earth's crust. In well water iron is usually found as ferrous iron, which is in a dissolved state and may appear clear when first drawn from the tap.

  • Advanced Diagnostics of Thermal Mass Flow Meters
    Advanced Diagnostics of Thermal Mass Flow Meters

    Many thermal mass flow meters are of the insertion type. As a starting point, proper insertion depth and straight run per the manufacturer’s recommendations should be adhered to.

  • Water Surge Prevention: Analysis Of Solutions And Alternatives
    Water Surge Prevention: Analysis Of Solutions And Alternatives

    Water Surge could cause damage in a water conveyance system, from leaking pipes to serious breakdowns and accidents the consequences of which could lead to heavy financial costs and even loss of life.  There are various solutions that are able to prevent or reduce the damage.  It is important to know the differences between the solutions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, before recommending the most suitable solution for the system.

  • An Example Set: WHUD
    An Example Set: WHUD

    In 2007, White House Utility District (WHUD), a water utility serving approximately 90,000 consumers and businesses in Tennessee, faced a dilemma: how to meet a projected growing demand for water within the budget and capital constraints faced by municipal and mid-sized utilities everywhere.

  • Can An Anti-Microbial Agent Extend The Life Of Filter Media?
    Can An Anti-Microbial Agent Extend The Life Of Filter Media?

    Harmsco Filtration Products conducted a test to evaluate the performance of the Anti-microbial filter media verses Standard filter media. Two cartridges were compared, both were manufactured with 4 oz filter media, one of the cartridge’s media contained Silver Zeolite fibers which inhibit the growth of biologicals in and on the filter cartridge.

  • Sniffer Dogs Now Being Used To Detect Water Main Leaks
    Sniffer Dogs Now Being Used To Detect Water Main Leaks

    Sniffer dogs have been used for a while in the oil and gas industry to find leaks. But recently, dogs have begun to be used to find leaks in water mains.

  • Ozone Disinfection System Provides Second Stage Treatment For Water Treatment Plant
    Ozone Disinfection System Provides Second Stage Treatment For Water Treatment Plant

    Tampa Bay Water’s state-of-the-art surface water treatment plant has provided high-quality drinking water to the Tampa Bay region.

  • Carbon Dioxide For pH Control Of Landfill Leachate
    Carbon Dioxide For pH Control Of Landfill Leachate

    A landfill operator’s leachate treatment plant in Missouri required pH reduction following lime-softening and prior to the biological wastewater treatment process. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was chosen as a substitute for sulfuric acid due to improved process control and a reduced tendency to form scale.

  • Why Water Infrastructure Should Be The Priority
    Why Water Infrastructure Should Be The Priority

    This article is in support of the Imagine a Day Without Water campaign — a national online movement to raise awareness about the value of water and water infrastructure. See more articles on AMERICAN’s Imagine a Day Without Water home page.

  • The 5 Most Common Questions That We Are Asked
    The 5 Most Common Questions That We Are Asked

    The versatility of 2nd Generation ATP monitoring technology enables it to be applied to a wide range of situations involving many sample types in many industries, from anaerobic sludge to paint products to ultra-purified water.

More Drinking Water Case Studies and White Papers

DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • New Water Turbidity Measurement Technology — The US Experience

    The amount of insoluble matter present in drinking water is an essential quality indicator. Silt, sand, bacteria, spores, and chemical precipitates all contribute to the cloudiness or turbidity of water. Drinking water (DW) which is highly turbid can be unpalatable and unsafe. Consumption of even low concentrations of certain bacteria and other microorganisms can cause serious health effects. Consequently, an accurate and sensitive measurement of turbidity is vital for ensuring that drinking water is free of these contaminants.

  • Innovative Solutions To Drinking Water Decontamination In Small And Medium Treatment Plants

    Air stripping technology effectively removes VOCs, THMs, and CO2 for improved adherence to water quality regulations.

  • The Basics: Monitoring Deionized Water

    Years ago, high purity water was used only in limited applications. Today, deionized (Dl) water has become an essential ingredient in hundreds of applications including: medical, laboratory, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics manufacturing, food processing, plating, countless industrial processes, and even the final rinse at the local car wash.

  • Validation Of Environmental Water Methods On One System

    Water quality laboratories across the nation are faced with both a rising level of water quality awareness amongst the general public, as well as rising costs in water quality monitoring. As a result, laboratories are looking for more efficient ways to provide higher quality monitoring.

  • Application Note: YSI 600 Optical Monitoring System Used To Protect Lake Oconee, Georgia Water Quality Northern Georgia is experiencing unprecedented development; consequently, water quality in many of its watersheds is in jeopardy of severe degradation. The State of Georgia, Environmental Protection Division (EPD) has implemented an NPDES monitoring and enforcement program designed to prevent construction activities from impacting water quality
  • Application Note: Ozone Measurement In Potable Water

    Ozone is a powerful oxidizing agent that can be used to destroy the organic compounds that affect the taste and odor of potable water. Environmental concerns have led to increased use of ozone because, unlike chlorine, it does not form hazardous by-products.

  • Application Note: Continuous Monitoring Of Drinking Water Provides Assurance Of Safety A water utility in Ohio wanted to learn more about the variability of water quality parameters such as pH, ORP, turbidity, and chlorine. Previously, most of these parameters had been measured by spot sampling protocols with only a few measurements during a daily period. In order to more accurately assess the water variability, the utility used a YSI 6920DW Drinking Water Multiprobe
  • Application Note: Using Real-Time Telemetry For Ecological Monitoring Of Coastal Wetlands The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR)in Mississippi is one of 27 protected estuarine reserves across the United States. By YSI
  • Activated Carbon And Adsorption Of Trichloroethylene (TCE) And Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are two of the most common solvents that contaminate groundwater supplies in the United States. Both solvents see frequent use in the extraction of fat, in the textile industry, in the production of various pharmaceutical and chemical products. TCE is also used as a degreaser from fabricated metal parts, and PCE serves as a component of aerosol dry-cleaning solvents.

  • 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors Improve Water Quality and EDI Performance

    Electrodeionization (EDI) is a widely used water treatment process. EDI technology is an electrochemical process that uses ion selective membranes and an electrical current to continuously remove ions from water. The process uses ion exchange resin to remove the ions from the feed stream, producing pure water.

More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

WEDECO TAK Series Open Channel Disinfection System by Xylem WEDECO TAK Series Open Channel Disinfection System by Xylem

WEDECO TAK Series Open Channel Disinfection System for wastewater applications.

E-Series® Ultrasonic Meters E-Series® Ultrasonic Meters

E-Series Ultrasonic water meters from Badger Meter use solid-state technology in a compact, totally encapsulated, weatherproof, and UV-resistant housing, suitable for residential and commercial applications.  Equipped with an easy-to-read, 9-digit LCD display, the Ultrasonic meter presents consumption, rate of flow, reverse-flow indication, and alarms.  With no moving parts, the E-Series meter also improves reliability and has greater extended low flow accuracy compared to other positive displacement meters; accurate to +/-3%.

Signet 2250 Hydrostatic Level Sensor Signet 2250 Hydrostatic Level Sensor

The Signet 2250 Hydrostatic Level Sensor for level and depth control has a one-piece injection molded PVDF body and ceramic diaphragm for superior compatibility in corrosive liquids

Capital Controls® CHLOR-A-VAC® Series 1420 Chemical Industion Unit Capital Controls® CHLOR-A-VAC® Series 1420 Chemical Industion Unit

The Series 1420 CHLOR-A-VAC® affords high efficiency addition and mixing of gases and liquid chemicals resulting in substantial chemical cost savings.

UAT™ Membrane Filtration Systems UAT™ Membrane Filtration Systems

UAT™ Pure Pro seawater desalination membrane filtration systems from De Nora Water Technologies are ideal for offshore oil and gas applications. The standard output capacities range from 2,000 GPD to 26,000 GPD (7,570 LPD to 98,410 LPD) and effectively produce fresh treated potable water, free of particulate matter or contaminants from a seawater source. Higher output capacities and custom configurations are available on a project to project basis.

OptiFiber<sup>®</sup> PES-14 Microfiber Cloth OptiFiber® PES-14 Microfiber Cloth

OptiFiber PES-14® Microfiber cloth filtration media is engineered to remove suspended solids, turbidity and fine particles up to 50% better than other filters or microscreens. Microfiber cloth media is proven to reduce total phosphorus to 0.1 mg/l or less.

More Products

LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

  • EPA's Plan To Regulate Chemical Contaminants In Drinking Water Is A Drop In The Bucket
    EPA's Plan To Regulate Chemical Contaminants In Drinking Water Is A Drop In The Bucket

    After more than a year of community meetings and deliberations, the U.S. EPA announced in February 2019 that it would begin the process of regulating two drinking water contaminants, seeking to stem a growing national public health crisis. If EPA follows through, this would be the first time in nearly 20 years that it has set an enforceable standard for a new chemical contaminant under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

  • Cities Turn To Desalination For Water Security, But At What Cost?
    Cities Turn To Desalination For Water Security, But At What Cost?

    Removing salts and other impurities from water is really difficult. For thousands of years people, including Aristotle, tried to make fresh water from sea water. In the 21st century, advances in desalination technology mean water authorities in Australia and worldwide can supply bountiful fresh water at the flick of a switch.

  • Why Big Storms And Deep Snows Don’t Always Equal Full Reservoirs
    Why Big Storms And Deep Snows Don’t Always Equal Full Reservoirs

    There’s a lot of attention paid to Colorado’s high country through the winter months.

  • How Can We Start The Journey To Smart Water Networks?
    How Can We Start The Journey To Smart Water Networks?

    In the developed world, potable water is delivered to people via a complex infrastructure consisting of water catchment, water treatment, water storage (reservoirs, towers), and water distribution (pipes). The first two elements are well understood; what is less understood is what happens to water as it journeys to the tap.

  • Global Experts Offer 2019 Smart Water Insights
    Global Experts Offer 2019 Smart Water Insights

    What are some of the biggest global challenges, trends, and opportunities for the smart water sector in 2019? To answer these questions, the Smart Water Networks Forum (SWAN) interviewed four industry experts from Australia, North America, the UK, and India.

  • Cybersecurity Is Key To Smart Metering Deployment
    Cybersecurity Is Key To Smart Metering Deployment

    As adoption of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) becomes more widespread, its appeal to cyber-attackers will undoubtedly increase, and addressing security vulnerabilities across layers — and by different stakeholders — must be taken into account from the outset.

More Drinking Water Features

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Kupferle Foundry - #9800i-GENESIS Turbine Powered Automatic Flushing Device With Chlorine Analyzer

The Eclipse i-Series model #9800i-GENESIS is the newest Intelligent Flushing & Monitoring Station Kupferle offers to maintain safe residual levels and remove DBPs from consumers' water. This permanently installed station incorporates a built-in chlorine analyzer to measure and record disinfectant residual levels based on a programmed sampling schedule.

Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water

The Western Governors' Drought Forum webinar “Once Marginal, Now Crucial: The Growing Demand for Re-used, Produced, and Brackish Water” explores the technological and regulatory obstacles to utilizing re-used, produced, and brackish water.

Tiny Motors That Can Clean Up Polluted Water

Scientists are developing new motors that are tiny and soft. They run on things like light, magnetic effects or chemical solutions. And they can serve specific functions — including cleaning up pollution.

We Are All Vulnerable To The Effects Of Water Pollution

Dr. Jamie Dewitt explains her research in Phamacology and Toxicology and why water pollution might pose a problem no matter where you are.

KC Water's Water Main Replacement Program Reduces Main Breaks 60%

KC Water is strategically and systematically replacing old water mains. Those in the most need get replaced first.

More Drinking Water Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.