DRINKING WATER

Innovative Project In Virginia Changes Lens On Wastewater
Innovative Project In Virginia Changes Lens On Wastewater

In September of 2016, Ted Henifin took the first sip of water purified at a pilot treatment plant developed by HRSD (Hampton Roads Sanitation District). Now, the innovative water treatment program known as SWIFT — Sustainable Water Initiative for Tomorrow — is changing the lens through which communities and government officials view wastewater, drinking water, aquifer replenishment, and even fighting sea level rise.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

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DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

Next Gen Capital Controls® Chlorinators Next Gen Capital Controls® Chlorinators

The unique compact design incorporates the best existing Capital Controls® technology with exciting new features. With just three models ranging from 10-10,000 lbs/day capacity, each chlorinator is available with automatic or manual feed and a 10” flowmeter for an easier read. Sonic operation on the 4100 model eliminates the need for a differential pressure regulator. On all automatic models, an additional controller isn’t needed, reducing components – and costs. 

Pressure Transmitter Pressure Transmitter

Our SITRANS P transmitters stand for measurement precision, ruggedness and maximum user-friendliness. And of course, when it comes to international approvals or industry standards, our measuring devices reliably meet the demands of the increasingly complex tasks found in the process industry.

Duplex Gravity Filter (DGF) Duplex Gravity Filter (DGF)

The Smith & Loveless Duplex Gravity Filter (DGF) removes suspended solids and particles, improving effluent quality. The standard system is available in sizes to fit any application, providing up to 200 square feet (18.6 square meters) of effective filtration area per unit. Dual media filtration increases filtration depth and limits the head loss problems associated with single-media designs.

OPTISENS MAC 080 Multiparameter Converter OPTISENS MAC 080 Multiparameter Converter

High End MAC 080 Multiparameter Converter allows a reliable and precise measurement of up to four parameters for waste water and sludge applications.

CX1100 In-Situ Oxygen Analyzer CX1100 In-Situ Oxygen Analyzer

The Rosemount CX1100 In-Situ Oxygen Analyzer provides measurement of oxygen in clean-burning applications. Get accurate oxygen measurements to optimize combustion reactions, reduce energy costs and meet environmental regulations. All welded construction and no reference gas requirement reduces installation and maintenance costs.

UV Package Plant UV Package Plant

Calgon Carbon UV Technologies is pleased to introduce the C3500D/PS Packaged System for UV Wastewater Disinfection. This product uniquely addresses the needs of smaller communities with effluent flows of less than 2.6 million gallons a day.

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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

  • How Drought And Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution
    How Drought And Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution

    A Q&A with Berkeley Lab hydrological science expert Bhavna Arora, who explains how unseasonably warm weather and drought can affect water quality

  • Coping With Mixed-Source Water Quality And Corrosion Challenges
    Coping With Mixed-Source Water Quality And Corrosion Challenges

    When it becomes necessary to expand or blend water supply sources, variety is not necessarily the spice of life. Whether new water sources are surface water or groundwater, fresh, brackish, seawater, or water recovered from aquifer storage, they can ultimately impact water treatment plant (WTP) operations and finished water quality — including compliance with the U.S. EPA Lead and Copper Rule.

  • New Testing Method For Lead And Arsenic In Contaminated Soil Saves Money And Protects Public Health
    New Testing Method For Lead And Arsenic In Contaminated Soil Saves Money And Protects Public Health

    EPA recently validated an innovative new technology to guide the cleanup of soils contaminated with arsenic and lead. The new laboratory method, based on a “virtual stomach” that mimics human digestion, estimates the bioavailability of arsenic and lead in soils quickly and inexpensively relative to animal models. This method will increase the accuracy of Human Health Risk Assessments, potentially reducing remediation costs.

  • How Is California Affected By The Clean Water Act Mess?
    How Is California Affected By The Clean Water Act Mess?

    Just when we thought the jurisdictional and regulatory issues concerning the federal Clean Water Act and the resulting implications could not get more complicated, recent developments have put that possibility to rest.

  • Help For São Paulo’s Complex Water Woes: Protect And Restore Forests
    Help For São Paulo’s Complex Water Woes: Protect And Restore Forests

    In 2014, São Paulo nearly ran out of water. Schools closed, crops faltered and reservoirs were left at a tiny 5 percent of their capacity for the city and its surrounding population of 22 million. It was the worst drought in eight decades.

  • What’s In Your Water? An Updated Analysis
    What’s In Your Water? An Updated Analysis

    NRDC’s new analysis of the most recent EPA data finds that nearly 30 million people in the United States drank water from community water systems that violated the EPA’s Lead and Copper Rule between January 2015 and March 2018.

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

What Is A Combined Sewer Overflow?

How does a combined sewer work? A representative from the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District (NEORSD) takes 60 seconds to draw a combined sewer and why they matter.

From Toilet To Tap Water

Alex and the crew travel to Saudi Arabia and talk to Noura Shehab, a Ph.D. student at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), about her research to use microbes to power sea water desalination.

Freshwater Salinization Syndrome: An Introduction

Across North America, streams and rivers are becoming saltier, thanks to road deicers, fertilizers and other salty compounds that humans indirectly release into waterways. At the same time, freshwater supplies are becoming more alkaline.

$600 Million Plan To Help Flint Proposed By Senate Democrats

A group of Congressional Democratic lawmakers from Michigan has proposed legislation to provide $600 million in financial assistance to help Flint deal with its current water crisis.

Water Reuse in the US: Adoption Trends and Market Growth

Bluefield Research analyst, Erin Bonney Casey, presents on water reuse markets in the U.S. during the WateReuse Association's One Water Innovations Press Workshop at WEFTEC 2014 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.