CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

Removing Iron, Arsenic and Manganese To Meet California Regulations
Removing Iron, Arsenic and Manganese To Meet California Regulations

Water from Well 19 and 20 in Sacramento, California area was high in manganese and arsenic. Due to the high levels, the wells were not being used to supply municipal water to the District. Each facility is planned to initially produce and treat approximately 600 gpm with a future expansion capacity to 1200 gpm.

Water Wholesaler In Dallas Fort-Worth Metro Area Upgrades To New Generation Of On-Site Hypochlorite Generation To Improve Safety And Reliability
Water Wholesaler In Dallas Fort-Worth Metro Area Upgrades To New Generation Of On-Site Hypochlorite Generation To Improve Safety And Reliability

The Upper Trinity Regional Water District (UTRWD) is a conservation district created by the State of Texas in 1989 to provide water, wastewater, solid waste and storm water services to numerous towns and cities approximately 50 miles northwest of Dallas. In 2010, the UTRWD installed three 2,000 pound per day (PPD) chlorine equivalent Microclor® OSHG systems. The systems continue to provide UTRWD with a reliable supply of hypochlorite for disinfection in a manner that is less expensive and less risky than gas chlorine or liquid bulk hypochlorite delivered via truck or rail through such a heavily populated area.

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CONTAMINANT REMOVAL PRODUCTS

Next Gen Capital Controls® Chlorinators Next Gen Capital Controls® Chlorinators

The unique compact design incorporates the best existing Capital Controls® technology with exciting new features. With just three models ranging from 10-10,000 lbs/day capacity, each chlorinator is available with automatic or manual feed and a 10” flowmeter for an easier read. Sonic operation on the 4100 model eliminates the need for a differential pressure regulator. On all automatic models, an additional controller isn’t needed, reducing components – and costs. 

GDT Mixing & Contacting Systems GDT Mixing & Contacting Systems

The GDT™ Process starts with the creation of ozone from an Ozone Generator. The ozone is then drawn into a Mazzei®Venturi Injector which provides dynamic mixing (a Back Pressure Control Valve adjusts injector outlet pressure optimizing ozone mass transfer in the system). Then mixing and contacting is enhanced in a Flash Reactor™. From there the two-phase flow travels to the Degas Separator (DS) & Relief Valve for additional mixing and entrained gas removal. And finally, the MTM Mixing Nozzles force dissolved ozone flow into the untreated water in the pipeline or basin for thorough mixing.

Carbon Systems Carbon Systems

Loprest designs and manufactures granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment systems for taste and odor applications, chlorine removal, PFC’s, 1 2 3 TCP, PCE/TCE, 1 4 dioxane, and many other contaminants. Loprest has a long, successful history in the selection and application of the proper carbon media for the application.

UV Package Plant UV Package Plant

Calgon Carbon UV Technologies is pleased to introduce the C3500D/PS Packaged System for UV Wastewater Disinfection. This product uniquely addresses the needs of smaller communities with effluent flows of less than 2.6 million gallons a day.

Injection Skids Injection Skids

Mazzei injection systems are designed using Mazzei’s patented technologies to obtain the most efficient mixing and contacting of air, oxygen, ozone or chemicals into a water stream.

Reliable. Flexible. Experienced. Ozone And Advanced Oxidation Reliable. Flexible. Experienced. Ozone And Advanced Oxidation

De Nora offers reliable, robust and proven ozone solutions to ensure peace of mind, backed by extensive global experience.

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DRINKING WATER CONTAMINANT REMOVAL PODCASTS

Groundbreaking Groundwater Treatment Groundbreaking Groundwater Treatment

Carollo Engineers and AdEdge Water Technologies share insight and expertise while bringing innovative groundwater treatment systems to market.

Water Quality Comes Under The Consumer Microscope Water Quality Comes Under The Consumer Microscope

Water quality is getting a lot more scrutiny these days. And that’s a good thing says Russ Swerdfeger, Global Director of Memcor Product Management with Evoqua. Alongside his colleague Daryl Weatherup, Director of Marketing with Evoqua, Swerdfeger recently discussed the future of drinking water and the key issues and concerns facing the water industry right now with Water Talk.

UV Disinfection With LEDs UV Disinfection With LEDs

UV LEDs offer the chemical free disinfection of traditional UV while avoiding mercury lamps. In certain applications where customers are concerned about the potential hazards of mercury contamination in the water from a broken lamp, UV LEDs are interesting because they don’t contain any mercury content at all.

The Microbes Have Us Outnumbered 20 To 1: Should We Be Worried? The Microbes Have Us Outnumbered 20 To 1: Should We Be Worried?

A lot has changed over the past 15 years. Back in the early 2000s, many utilities weren’t interested in understanding what was in their water beyond the contaminant and disinfection byproduct levels they were regulated to comply with. But as Pat Whalen, President and CEO of LuminUltra, explains in this ACE 2018 Water Talk interview, a steady stream of ongoing education and the modern data storage and analytics that cloud computing provides, has developed some rabid fans eager to explore the microbiology of their water systems.

A Sustainable Solution For Treating Contaminants A Sustainable Solution For Treating Contaminants

There are a number of regulations in drinking water centered around emerging contaminants. Hexavalent chromium is one that you’ll see on the national marketplace.

De Nora Doubles Down On Innovation De Nora Doubles Down On Innovation

With 29 locations, 1,600 employees and research facilities in Japan, Italy and the United States, DeNora is one of the largest disinfection and filtration companies in the world. As Gary Lohse, Regional Sales Manager for De Nora, explains in this Water Online Radio interview, the acquisition of the former Severn Trent manufacturing division coupled with De Nora’s product innovation strength is driving enhancements to some of the most respected brands in the water industry.

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CONTAMINANT REMOVAL VIDEOS

TrojanUV at ACE10 - The Launch of Solo Lamp™ Technology (Video) TrojanUV at ACE10 - The Launch of Solo Lamp™ Technology (Video)

Under the big red umbrella, Jennifer Muller of TrojanUV discusses the company’s new solo lamp technology and the TrojanUV Torrent, a large-scale drinking water disinfection system being introduced at the show.

How To Install A UV Lamp How To Install A UV Lamp

This video features a step-by-step demonstration of how to change out a used UV lamp and install a new one.

Sherbrooke Water Filtration Plant Video Testimonial Sherbrooke Water Filtration Plant Video Testimonial

This video features the lead operator for the ozone and filtration systems at the Sherbrooke Water Filtration Plant in Quebec, Canada, Mr. Yves DelaFontaine.  As you’ll see in the video, Yves has high remarks for Pinnacle’s modular capability, built in redundancy and ease of installation, which took place in 2014.  

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ABOUT

The removal of contaminants from public drinking water systems in the US is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. These are legally enforceable standards that protect public health by limiting the levels of contaminants in drinking water. Similar regulations are managed by agencies worldwide to protect their citizens from drinking water contamination.

There are a plethora of drinking water contaminant removal technologies that public and private water systems use to comply with the EPA’s drinking water regulations. These include reverse osmosis, membrane, nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, chlorine disinfection, UV disinfection and Ozone-based disinfection practices.

The EPA’s list of drinking water contaminants is organized into six types of contaminants and lists each contaminant along with its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), some of the potential health effects from long-term exposure above the MCL and the probable source of the drinking water contaminant.

The six types of contaminants are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

Examples of microbiological, organic contaminants are Cryptosporidium and Giardia lamblia. Both of these microorganic pathogens are found in human or animal fecal waste and cause gastrointestinal illness, such as diarrhea and vomiting.

A common disinfectant used in municipal drinking water treatment to disinfect microorganisms is chlorine. The EPA’s primary drinking water regulations require drinking water treatment plants to maintain a maximum disinfectant residual level (MDRL) for chlorine of 4.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Some of the detrimental health effects of chlorine above the MCL are eye irritation and stomach discomfort.

Similarly, byproducts from the chlorine-based disinfection methods used by public water systems to remove contaminants can be contaminants in their own right if not removed from the drinking water prior to it being released into the distribution system. Examples of disinfection byproducts include bromate, chlorite and total trihalomethanes (TTHMs). Not removed from drinking water, these disinfection byproducts can increase risk of cancer and cause central nervous system issues.

Chemical contamination of drinking water can be caused by inorganic chemicals such as arsenic, barium lead, mercury and cadmium or organic chemicals such as benzene, dichloroethane and other carbon-derived compounds. These chemicals get into source water through a variety of natural and industrial processes. Arsenic for example is present in source water through the erosion of natural deposits.  Many of the chemical contaminants are derived from industrial wastewater such as discharges from petroleum refineries, steel or pulp mills or the corrosion of asbestos cement water mains or galvanized pipes.

Radium and uranium are examples of radionuclides. Radium 226 and Radium 228 must be removed to a level of 5 picocuries/liter (PCI/L) and Uranium to a level of 30 micrograms/liter (30 ug/L).