Contaminant Removal Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Eliminating A Silent Killer — A Critical Review On The Viability Of Decentralized Arsenic Removal Systems For Rural Communities
    9/20/2018

    Arsenic is a global environmental health issue. Since it was recognized in the nineties many techniques have been developed on the remediation on arsenic contaminated drinking water. Solving people’s exposure through drinking water to arsenic is, however, a complex problem.

  2. On-Site Hypochlorite System Delivers Historic Efficiency Levels
    9/29/2018

    In one of Pennsylvania’s three original counties, water has played an integral – even historic – role in the region’s development.

  3. San Jose Water Company Solves Chloramine Residual Problem With The Process Solutions, Inc. Monoclor® RCS Chloramine Management System
    7/10/2018

    A San Jose Water Quality Engineer said, "I wasn’t convinced that PSI’s Monoclor chloramine dosing system would solve our problems after several failed attempts to improve residual, but with PSI offering a trial including installation, operation, and troubleshooting for three months, San Jose Water decided to invest the necessary resources to pilot this system.

  4. Monoclor Chloramine Residual Management System Manages Residual For Problematic 5.5 Million Gallon Tank
    7/10/2018

    Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD) serves about 142,000 customers in Riverside County, CA. The EMWD service area is one of the largest for any water district in arid southern California. On the drinking water side, EMWD manages two water treatment plants and over 15 reservoirs. With 70% of the district’s water coming from the Metropolitan Water District with chloramine disinfection, EMWD has become reliant on chloramine disinfection to manage long transmission lines and longer detention times.

  5. Utility Enjoys More Than Seven Years of On‐Site Sodium Hypochlorite Production
    7/16/2018

    “To me, Microclor® is the top of the line on‐site generation system on the market due to low maintenance and it being very user friendly.” Larry English, Water Quality Manager, Daphne Utilities. Read the full project profile to learn more.

  6. How To Know It’s Time To Replace Your RO Membrane
    9/5/2017

    Reverse osmosis, or RO, is one of the finest technologies to purify water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS) levels of more than 500 ppm. Reverse osmosis plant exporters explain the technology as a separation technology where dissolved and invisible impurities in water are separated with the help of semi-permeable membrane or RO membrane that works under high pressure.

  7. Removing Iron, Arsenic and Manganese To Meet California Regulations
    10/9/2018

    Water from Well 19 and 20 in Sacramento, California area was high in manganese and arsenic. Due to the high levels, the wells were not being used to supply municipal water to the District. Each facility is planned to initially produce and treat approximately 600 gpm with a future expansion capacity to 1200 gpm.

  8. EPA Researchers Partner With WaterStep To Deliver Clean Water During Emergencies
    9/11/2018

    Following a disaster like the back-to-back hurricanes that hit Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico in 2017, water systems can become flooded and unable to provide safe drinking water to communities. EPA researchers recognized the need for portable water treatment systems that can quickly and cost-effectively provide safe drinking water to affected communities following a disaster. 

  9. Need More Water? Think Ozone-BAC For 'One Water' Resolution
    8/25/2017

    If you thought reverse osmosis was the one and only choice for potable water reuse, think again. Ozonation followed by biological activated carbon (ozone-BAC) is more suited to inland communities and may be better at removing chemicals of emerging concern (CECs).

  10. Groundwater Replenished To Prevent Sea Level Rise
    10/4/2018

    Groundwater in Southeastern coastal Virginia is depleting due to over-drafting without intentional replenishment. This phenomenon makes the Potomac aquifer susceptible to saltwater intrusion as well as land subsidence, or the gradual settling or sudden sinking of the earth’s surface. The Hampton Roads Sanitation District responded to these issues by using groundwater augmentation as a way to recharge the aquifer, prevent saltwater intrusion, and potentially increase ground elevation.