Drinking Water Disinfection [Case Studies White Paper]

  1. Hydro-Guard® Improves Water Quality And Saves Man-Hours For Central Texas Vacation Community
    3/10/2015

    The user population of a Central Texas resort system does not reach its peak until summer and the resultant levels of peak and low usage vary widely. This fluctuation impacts levels of disinfectant residual and, consequently, water quality — especially at the end of the line. Manual flushing of the utility's hydrants to maintain water quality has resulted in excessive time and labor as workers must access the outlying areas.

  2. Technical Support And Service Are Key In A Place “Way Outside Of Ordinary”
    7/12/2018

    Rangely is a remote town with a population of just over 2,200 people located in the upper northwest area of Colorado, thirteen miles from the Utah border. During the course of their routine maintenance, operators noticed problems with a distribution pump. Read the full project profile to learn how Process Solutions’ trained service technicians were able to walk them through a series of diagnostics to further isolate the problem and get the system was back up and running in a short period of time.

  3. Treatment of Groundwater Contaminated With 1,4-Dioxane - Tucson, Arizona (Case Study)
    5/1/2019

    The TrojanUVPhox™ installation at Tucson's Advanced Oxidation Process Water Treatment Facility treats 1,4-dioxane and produces water that is blended and then treated at the neighboring Tucson Airport Remediation Project facility. This purified water is supplied to nearly 50,000 end users.

  4. Burnsville Becomes First Metro System With On-Site Hypochlorite Generation
    7/24/2018

    When Linda Mullen took over as water superintendent in Burnsville in 2007, the city was in the process of adding surface‐water treatment to its existing plant. Burnsville began purchasing water from the nearby Kraemer Mining and Materials quarry, both to supplement its supply and to help the quarry meet discharge permits.

  5. Top 10 Considerations When Converting To On-Site Hypochlorite
    12/26/2013

    Transporting pure salt - the raw material needed to generate sodium hypochlorite onsite – is more cost effective, stable, and safer, than transporting and storing bulk sodium hypochlorite, or gaseous/liquid chlorine cylinders from local chemical suppliers. The conversion to on-site hypochlorite generation can be achieved by adhering to these design guidelines.

  6. On-Site Chlorine Generation Replaces Conventional Chlorine Gas Feed System In Scottsdale AZ
    12/25/2013

    The city of Scottsdale, Arizona, a community of more than 200,000 residents was historically totally dependent on groundwater resources.  By the mid 1980’s, the city began putting together a multi-faceted water resource program to provide the community with a long-term sustainable water supply.

  7. Water Utility Selects WEDECO Advanced Treatment Technologies To Purify Urban Runoff
    2/20/2015

    In February 2010, the Dempsey E. Benton Water Treatment Plant (DEBWTP) added 16 million gallons per day (MGD) of capacity to the water utility operated by the city of Raleigh, North Carolina.

  8. Australian City Installs Microclor On‐Site Sodium Hypochlorite Generation System
    7/24/2018

    Bathurst is the home of the Bathurst 1000 Race, the largest NASCAR-style “touring car” race in Australia. On race day, tens of thousands of additional visitors tax the capacity of the Bathurst 5 million-gallon-per- day wastewater treatment plant. The diligence and capability of the treatment staff allows the plant to meet the challenge every year. 

  9. Need More Water? Think Ozone-BAC For 'One Water' Resolution
    8/25/2017

    If you thought reverse osmosis was the one and only choice for potable water reuse, think again. Ozonation followed by biological activated carbon (ozone-BAC) is more suited to inland communities and may be better at removing chemicals of emerging concern (CECs).

  10. WEDECO UV Disinfection Produces Highly Purified Water In Silicon Valley
    5/7/2015

    With diminished rainfall, a depleted aquifer basin, near-empty recharge ponds, and an earthquake-vulnerable aqueduct system, the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) in San Jose, CA, required additional water supplies to maintain regional economic vitality for its growing community.